LSAT Follies: Kids Say the Darndest Things

LSATYou have to love the internet.  If you’re looking for the spectacularly silly without a hint of self-reflection, you’ll find it, always joined by a cheering section of even greater silliness.  Here’s an example, a discussion of techniques of LSAT takers to psych out other takers, on the principle that if the psych-ee does worse, the psych-er (or psych-o) will have done better.  T-shirts?  Offensive odors?  The “Best Way to Distract Other Test-Takers”?  Really?

Never mind that there are thousands of takers, so the effect of this nonsense is statistically insignificant and is likely a greater distraction to the distracter.  And never mind which of the people thinking about or using these techniques you’d actually want representing you as a lawyer.

The comical list of LSAT dirty tricks leads me to think that maybe everyone needs an LSAT reality check.  True, the LSAT is the most important determinant in law school admissions.  If you’re committed to maximizing your law school opportunities, you should take it seriously.  Also true, exam day is stressful and long.  Of all the things the LSAT is theorized to test or not test, one thing it incontrovertibly does test is your composure and ability to ignore distractions.  That’s why I structure Advise In’s LSAT program the way I do.  I’ve talked about this in our free white paper and in blogposts and presentations. Advise-In emphasizes exam day from the start and develops easy-to-use techniques customized for each client to minimize distractions on exam day—including the bush-league distractions proffered on the top law school forum.

But I also practiced law at a major law firm for over 8 years.  Here’s a basic (and obvious) fact—the stress of an exam question, which just lays there waiting for you to answer it, is insignificant in comparison to the practice of law.  I’d bet that no practicing lawyer has ever thought, “This is really hard, but at least it’s not the LSAT.”  When you practice law, you’ll have to handle—and generally be a steadying influence on—living, breathing clients in the context of complex long-term processes with short bursts of intense activity.  Being an effective, trusted counselor in complicated transactions or litigation, and developing, executing and modifying long-term strategies, are real stressors.  The LSAT is just a test—a hard and important test, but just a test.

You can think of your LSAT preparation as the beginning of the process of becoming a lawyer.  Not just because it’s a gating item for law school admissions but also because you can develop a tolerance for distractions and stress.  So, if you’re serious about being a lawyer, and serious about preparing for the LSAT, maybe the right attitude for you to take toward those who have nothing better to do with their time than think of ways to distract you, is—take your best shot but it won’t matter.  If you’ve done your job, you won’t be distracted by juvenile tricks during the LSAT, and you’ll have taken one step to being an effective counselor.

~ by Kyle Pasewark at Advise-in Solutions on June 15, 2010.

5 Responses to “LSAT Follies: Kids Say the Darndest Things”

  1. […] who are taking the LSAT should approach it as a step to developing certain lawyering skills, as I’ve said before, but that’s a long way from baseless speculation about the relationship between a logic game and […]

  2. […] be distractions.  Simple as that.  The person next to you may be irritating, there are people who try to depress other takers, the proctors may be loud or walk around, their time cues may be inconsistent, etc.  You need to […]

  3. […] be distractions.  Simple as that.  The person next to you may be irritating, there are people who try to depress other takers, the proctors may be loud or walk around, their time cues may be inconsistent, etc.  You need to […]

  4. […] You’re competing only against the LSAT itself, and that should be your sole focus.  What the person next to you does doesn’t matter to you—it’s statistically insignificant.  And that makes it easier (but still not easy) to focus on […]

  5. […] be distractions. Simple as that. The person next to you may be irritating, there are people who try to depress other takers, the proctors may be loud or walk around, their time cues may be inconsistent, etc. You need to […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: